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Colabello finding success with tweaked mechanics

Colabello finding success with tweaked mechanics

Colabello finding success with tweaked mechanics play video for Colabello finding success with tweaked mechanics

MINNEAPOLIS -- Chris Colabello said a fix in his swing mechanics has led to better results at the plate.

Colabello has been on fire through the first five games of September, hitting .400 with three homers, a double and eight RBIs after going hitless in his final seven games of August. Entering Saturday, Colabello was hitting .266/.382/.531 with five homers and 11 RBIs in 19 games dating back to Aug. 6,

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Colabello said he worked with hitting coach Tom Brunansky to fix his mechanics, and he realized that he had dealt with a similar issue at Triple-A Rochester.

"It was something I had actually had gone through in early May, where I was releasing too early with my top hand," Colabello said. "That's what allows me to get to balls inside and hit fastballs. I actually found a text I had sent to a friend in early May, and had one of those moments where I slapped myself in the back of the head for not being aware of it."

Colabello, 29, figures to get plenty of playing time at first base the rest of the season, especially with Justin Morneau now in Pittsburgh. But Twins manager Ron Gardenhire isn't ready to say whether he believes Colabello can be a full-time first baseman moving forward.

Colabello is hitting .216/.300/.400 with seven homers in 40 games with the Twins this year, and he's posted 46 strikeouts. He also won International League MVP honors after hitting .352/.427/.639 with 24 homers and 25 doubles in 89 games with Triple-A Rochester.

"I think we just need to let it play out," Gardenhire said. "He has a lot of strikeouts right now, but he's put the ball in the seats. So you'd like to see some more contact. But he's definitely a different-type swinger with a lot flowing toward the pitcher's mound. So it's a work in progress with him. We're just letting him play it out, and not try to decide on his future until he has more time here."

Rhett Bollinger is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Bollinger Beat, and follow him on Twitter @RhettBollinger. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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